Michaela Community School | Science – 09.05.2015 – Do Your Kids Hate Science Yet?
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Science – 09.05.2015 – Do Your Kids Hate Science Yet?

11 May 2015, Posted by admin in Michaela's Blog

Posted on May 9, 2015 by Olivia Dyer

Do Your Kids Hate Science Yet?

Last week, a science teacher who had heard about the knowledge-led, mastery-focused curriculum at Michaela asked me, “do your kids hate Science yet?” On the same day, I attended a ‘knowledge versus skills’ science debate. The skills troops were gathered and I was offered an insight into the ideological battlefield. There was a real sense of dissatisfaction by how little their sevens’ loved Science. The troops seemed to agree that the reason why secondary school science does not inspire young minds is because there are not enough opportunities for discovery, creativity and awe-inspiring practicals. I agreed that many science departments in secondary schools do not inspire young minds. However, this is because those departments do not have a high enough level of rigour in their curriculum at Key Stage Three. Even their lower ability pupils are not sufficiently challenged.

Quite frankly, science departments around the country patronise children. They do this by trying to get their children to be scientists and think like scientists. Ironically, by trying to treat the pupils like adult scientists, they end up patronising them by turning lessons into ‘playing grown-ups’. Even at Advanced Level, I did not think like a scientist. On starting out, even Aristotle did not think like a scientist. Instead, he was deeply influenced by his teacher, Plato. Aristotle’s work on geology, physics, metaphysics, psychology, biology and medicine were founded on the 20 years that he spent at Plato’s Academy, accumulating masses of knowledge and experience.

Thousands of hours of practice are needed to become an expert at something. This is what our pupils are missing. We cannot fast forward time. Instead, we need to embed knowledge into their long-term memory. If something has not been converted to long-term memory, nothing has been learned. Once pupils have mastered the content, we then need to give them lots of practice at retrieving that knowledge. This is how we can achieve skilled performance over years.

One thing I think that I can agree on with the troops, is that all teachers want their pupils to go out and change the world. Knowledge is power. It is knowledge about the intricacies of organelle structure that will enable them to go and study Biology at undergraduate level, not that practical that used iodine to measure the amount of starch in different foods. Children love knowing things. Watch the videos below; they speak for themselves.

https://youtu.be/YQZMk19qQ-E

https://youtu.be/1Bx9OFXlCvE

Teachers need to think about the opportunity cost of ‘awe-inspiring practicals’. Time spent doing fun, whizzy practicals is time not spent mastering the particulars of the alkali metals or the halogens. Children feel successful when they know things. Next time you submit your practical requisitions, consider why your pupils are doing the practical. If it is to help them discover, be creative or awe-inspired, think again. Do not underestimate the satisfaction and awe your pupils can gain from being told facts.

Recommended reading:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Seven-Myths-About-Education-Christodoulou/dp/0415746825

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Why-Dont-Students-Like-School/dp/047059196X

http://www.aft.org/sites/default/files/periodicals/WILLINGHAM%282%29.pdf

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