Michaela Community School | Science – 27.02.2016 – Selling Science
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Science – 27.02.2016 – Selling Science

29 Feb 2016, Posted by admin in Michaela's Blog

Posted on February 27, 2016 by Olivia Dyer

Selling Science

Astronomy is my hard sell of physical science. Think of astronomy as the confectionary placed at the point of purchase in a well-known chain of high street stationary shops. How did the checkout boy, Alex, know I wanted a super sized bag of sour sweets at 10 am on a Saturday morning? I want the children to LOVE physics. I want them thinking, “How did Miss Dyer know I loved physics so much?!”. Which is why their introduction to secondary school physical science is astronomy. This is an eight-week unit designed with the number one purpose to blow their minds. The reason I chose to teach them about astronomy before electronics or mechanics is because it is truly fascinating. When I speak to pupils from other schools or my grown up friends about their experience of ‘physics’ at school, they tell me that they are or were taught so badly that they gave up, thinking that physics was not for them. If not for them, then who is physics for?

Caroline Herschel is the first scientific enquirer that pupils are introduced to in this unit. She was a pockmarked, four-foot three-inch woman whose family assumed that she would never marry and felt it was best for her to train to be a housemaid due to a childhood bout of typhus. In fact, Caroline Herschel beat the odds to receive many honours for her scientific achievements. Together with Mary Somerville, she was first woman to receive honorary membership of the Royal Society in 1835. Children are designed to leave the lesson where they learn about Caroline Herschel thinking, “Yes, physics is definitely for me”; “If Caroline Herschel can do it, why can’t I?”; “Nebulae are amazing!”. The astronomy unit taught at Michaela goes into far more depth than any other astronomy unit that I have ever taught at any other secondary school.

In this post, I have included an excerpt of the astronomy textbook that I have written and teach from, to give an idea of the content. The devil is in the detail. You cannot expect a pupil to love astronomy merely by learning the order of the eight planets and about the phases of the Moon. No, let’s not patronize the children that we are expected to teach. At Michaela, pupils learn about different models of the Solar System and references can be made to Ptolemy and his view of the Universe, thanks to Jonathan Porter’s history curriculum that includes Ancient Greece. Pupils learn that although Georges Lemaître first conceived the Big Bang theory, that the phrase ‘big bang’ was coined, ironically, by Fred Hoyle – an astronomer who disagreed with this theory. It is the links that can be made between science and other disciplines and the small pieces of information that are not usually found in science curricula, that children really love.

A recent visitor to Michaela asked a group of five year eight pupils what their career aspirations were. The responses were: experimental physicist, astronomer, ambivalent (!), mathematician and pilot. A year after being taught astronomy, some pupils actively want to pursue a career in the physical sciences. Using astronomy to sell the physical sciences? I say give it a go.

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